Masquerade

One of the comic elements of a staged drama such as an opera or play is that people often try to disguise themselves in the simplest ways. A character will not be noticed once they place a hat on their head or a mask on their face.

One of my favorite Broadway musicals, “The Phantom of the Opera,” contains a song that speaks of this idea of putting on a mask to hide your identity.

“Masquerade!
Paper faces on parade . . .
Masquerade!
Hide your face,
so the world will
never find you!”

“Masquerade!
Seething shadows
breathing lies . . .
Masquerade!
You can fool
any friend who
ever knew you!”

When you watch a scene like this unfold, you often sit in disbelief as to how the characters could be so clueless as to the true identity of each character.

A mask cannot hide your true identity.

While this principle is obvious on the stage, it is often overlooked in other areas.

One such area that we overlook this is on the web.

The web as we know it actually contains three layers: the Surface Web, the Deep Web, and the Dark Web.

The Surface Web is any portion that is accessible through an internet search engine.

The Deep Web is that which is unsearchable yet accessible with credentials such as an email account.

The Dark Web is the hidden portion of the web that is only accessible if you know where to look.

deep-web-iceberg

The idea behind the lower levels of the internet is to provide even more privacy. Specifically, the promise of the Dark Web is that you should become anonymous.

By entering into the Dark Web, you are putting on a digital mask.

Behind this digital mask, in the “seething shadows” of the Dark Web,  people think they fool those who know them and those who don’t. Thus, many of the uses of the dark web involve harm to self and others.

However, just like the mask on stage, the digital mask is just an illusion.

Our actions on the web, even when masked, can be traceable with the right knowledge because in the end its all a system of 1s and 0s.

Anonymity is all a masquerade.

So stop trying to put on a mask and embrace your childhood fear of the dark when it comes to the web.

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